"Why Weren't There Great Artists?" All The Answers Are In The New Dior Collection
"Why Weren't There Great Artists?" All The Answers Are In The New Dior Collection

Video: "Why Weren't There Great Artists?" All The Answers Are In The New Dior Collection

Video: "Christian Dior, Designer of Dreams" at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs 2022, December
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The new collection of Maria Grazia Chiuri is aiming right in the heart of a feminist. The spring-summer show took place at the Musée Rodin in Paris, converted for the occasion into a cave lined with shards of mirrors and equipped with dozens of chambers hanging from the ceiling like stalactites. The show was opened by Sasha Pivovarova. Her release became something of a title for the entire collection, defining from the doorway both its stylistic direction and theme. Washed jeans flared from the hip, a traditional sailor cap with a visor and a vest with the headline of Linda Nochlin's legendary programmatic feminist essay "Why Were There No Great Artists?" 1971. In search of an answer to this question, the designer goes, as is already clear from the title bow, in the 1960s, when the House of Dior entered the era of Marc Bohan.

At the end of 1960, when Yves Saint Laurent was drafted into military service, it was Bohan who replaced him as chief designer and held it for no less than 29 years, until Gianfranco Ferre came in 1989. Having worked as the creative director of Christian Dior for nearly three decades, Marc Bohan managed to radically change the style of the brand, formulating its new idea as “clothes for real women”. The first collection of Marc Boan presented the House's clients with a new silhouette: trousers combined with ordinary safari-style jackets and jackets, as well as men's striped or polka-dot shirts, soft-shaped little elegant dresses, overalls and light skirts. Instead of New Look - Slim Look. Exploring Bohan's archives, Maria Grazia also reshapes the chiseled silhouette of the classic "bar" jacket,smoothing the exaggerated contrast between the lush breasts and the wasp waist for a straight, narrow double-breasted jacket with sloping shoulders in the spirit of King Edward. Or, to put it simply, that Slim Look is absolutely typical of the 1960s and is more masculine than feminine. This was worn by the 1960s star, "Bob Dylan in a Skirt,

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