Table of contents:

A Brief History Of The Union Of Fashion And Art
A Brief History Of The Union Of Fashion And Art

Video: A Brief History Of The Union Of Fashion And Art

Video: The Quickest History of 20th Century Art in Russia 2022, December
Anonim

Fashion has always strived for art: if you do not become it, then at least from time to time intersect with it. These intersection points can rightfully be considered the collections on which the designers worked side by side with the artists. On the first day of December, the release of the joint collection of H&M and Alex Katz is scheduled, and on the eve of it, we decided to recall the most outstanding collaborations of this kind of past years.

Salvador Dali x Elsa Schiaparelli

Italian Elsa Schiaparelli has always gathered around her the best representatives of bohemia, and their communication often flowed beyond parties into the professional sphere. Her collaboration with the chief surrealist of all time, Salvador Dali, has become especially firmly in the history of fashion (and art too). The designer and artist created the jacket with drawer pockets and the famous dress with lobster and parsley. Dali also inspired Schiaparelli to create such iconic items as a hat-shoe, gloves with match pockets and gloves with long fake nails.

Image
Image

Yasumasa Morimura x Issey Miyake

The idea of ​​joint work with an interesting artist came to Issei Miyaka in 1996. With his love for pleating, which, incidentally, he discovered for himself while enjoying the dynamic paintings of Henri Rousseau, the goal was quite simple - to put a print from a canvas on the clothes and add a pleated effect so that the image would not be distorted. The first artist with whom Miyake decided to do a joint project was Yasumasa Morimura. To create a painting, Morimura takes the original works of the great masters and "attaches" his own head or body to the image. For Miyake, he “intertwined” his body with a naked woman from Jean August Dominique Ingress's painting “La Source”. As fashion historian IP Cutler noted, “three artists born at completely different times - two artists and a designer - created one dress”.

The Chapman Brothers x Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton has collaborated with the notorious artist brothers twice. In 2013, the creative director of the men's line at the House of Kim Jones commissioned Jake and Dinos Chapman to design art prints for clothing and travel bags. The brothers painted things with bright embroidery - both childishly fabulous and wild - and they were dubbed "The Garden in Hell" (the epithet was coined by Diana Vreeland for her own apartment). Jones was so impressed that he again invited British art rebels, daringly savoring the themes of Nazism, the Ku Klux Klan and the work of Francisco Goya, to work on prints for the Louis Vuitton men's collection spring-summer 2017. The Chapman brothers did not take long to persuade themselves and this time they decorated men's shirts and raincoats with images of African animals.

Image
Image

Louis Vuitton, 2013; Louis Vuitton, spring-summer 2017

Graffiti Artists x Prada

Miuccia Prada is a well-known fan of contemporary art: in 1993 she founded the Prada Fondazione, which supports artists and other artists. In the spring-summer 2014 season, the designer decided to turn to street art: inspired by the painting of muralists from Latin America and not only, Prada released a collection, items from which adorned the paintings of six artists: El Mac from the USA, Mesa from Spain, Gabriel Specter from Canada, Stinkfish from Colombia, Jeanne Detalante from France and Pierre Morne, also from France. They not only created prints, but also decorated the space where the show took place with their signature drawings. By the way, this is not the first case of Prada's direct collaboration with artists: for example, the famous illustrator James Jean helped her work on the spring-summer 2008 collection.

Damien Hirst x Alexander McQueen

When 10 years have passed since the release of the first iconic scarf with a skull, Alexander McQueen decided to celebrate this event with a collaboration with the renowned artist. His choice fell on one of the most high-profile artists of our time - Damien Hirst. In 2003, McQueen produced 30 handkerchiefs, each with an image by Hirst from his "Entomology" series. The result is a truly art collection, in which Hirst's kaleidoscopic insect motifs harmoniously framed McQueen's signature skulls. According to Hirst, their project is "a marriage made in heaven."

Image
Image

Daniel Buren x Louis Vuitton

While the collection itself was inspired by the work of the legendary French artist, author of conceptual striped posters and other graphic works, Daniel Buren was directly involved in the development of the fantastically bright Louis Vuitton spring-summer 2013 show. As a result, it was difficult to say where his work began and where it ended: the energy of the clothes created by Marc Jacobs existed in the same space with the entourage designed by Buren. The artist and designer were so imbued with joint creativity that they continued to collaborate both on the filming of an advertising campaign and in decorating Louis Vuitton boutiques.

Olaf Brening x Bally

The collaboration of the Swiss artist with a great sense of humor and the brand famous for its high-quality leather goods was presented in 2011 at the Miami International Contemporary Art Fair. Olaf Brening and Bally's creative directors Michael Hertz and Graham Fiedler not only released a line of shoes and accessories in luscious and flashy colors, but also shot a very conceptual ad, for which Brening drew ideas from the work of Andy Warhol. “I've always loved Andy's Marilyn (Warhol's iconic pop art portrait of an actress. - Ed.) And wanted to honor them both in my own language,” the artist explained.

Image
Image

Keith Haring x Nicholas Kirkwood

The eccentric American artist and sculptor Keith Haring has long been an icon of contemporary art. Its naive and variegated graphics, in places reminiscent of children's scribbles, in fact carries satire on the topic of the day. Sadly, Haring himself died at the age of only 31 in 1990, but his foundation is still active in helping children with AIDS, and is also responsible for the legacy of the iconic pop artist. Together with this foundation, a collection of footwear designer Nicholas Kirkwood was created in 2011, in which every centimeter of ankle boots and shoes is covered with Haring's drawings. By the way, this is not the only case when the foundation allowed the designer to borrow the works of the artist: in 2010, Tommy Hilfiger released a limited shoe collection with drawings by Haring.

Yayoi Kusama x Louis Vuitton

“In 2006, Marc Jacobs flew to see me in Tokyo and asked if I would like to go to the States and try to do a joint project with him. This inspired me so much, because I have always been interested in fashion,”said a Japanese artist known for her bright polka dots. Since that year, Yayoi Kusama has done a great job, doing graphic design, shop and window dressing, or clothing. In 2012, she teamed up with Jacobs to create a capsule collection of Louis Vuitton apparel and accessories, strewn with her signature peas. Although, of course, the interior of the boutique for the same Louis Vuitton is truly amazing, reminiscent of a psychedelic seabed from another planet.

Image
Image

Takashi Murakami x Louis Vuitton x Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles

This collaboration brought together three prominent giants at once: the Japanese pop art artist Takashi Murakami, the legendary French brand Louis Vuitton headed by Marc Jacobs, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. The latter housed a Louis Vuitton pop-up store under its roof, where anyone could buy items created by the Jacobs-Murakami duo. It happened in 2007, although the artist and designer have been collaborating since 2003. Surprising but true: Murakami's cartoon graphics added freshness and childishness to Louis Vuitton classics straight from the streets of Tokyo, and the result is very original. Jacobs can handle such risky adventures like no other.

James Nares x Coach

James Nares, a renowned New York abstract painter, developed his own style of painting. Although at first glance his continuous thick strokes of paint may seem unpretentious, but if you look closely, they have one unusual quality: they seem to depict flowing time frozen in space. In general, like any abstract painting, Neirs's work must be understood. As for fashion brands, Coach understood and appreciated him better than others. The brand invited the artist to work in one team with the designers on the line of bags. In April 2012, Coach and Nares showed the world six large white tote bags embellished with broad strokes of deep greens, cadmium reds, hot pinks and more, as well as black tote bags with pearlescent metallic paint.

Image
Image

Anselm Reile x Dior

Christian Dior has always been known for his love of art (to begin with, he owned an art gallery before founding his own fashion house), so it makes sense that his brand should seek collaboration with some worthy artist. In 2012, Dior launched a capsule collection of shoes, bags and jewelry, on which he worked with Berlin-based artist and sculptor Anselm Reile. At Reile's hand were classic handbags and clutches, ballet flats and heels, earrings and bracelets, painted in cool neon colors, metallic and covered with camouflage patterns. Moreover, the artist tilted the traditional Dior's quilted design on the bags at a 45-degree angle. Thus, he breathed into the familiar things of the Berlin underground dynamics.

Rosson Crowe x Zac Posen

American artist Rosson Crowe met designer Zach Posen through friends. In an interview, Crowe shared that a stylist she knew called her and offered to work together on the fashion collection of his designer boyfriend. That boyfriend turned out to be Posen, and in 2010, the artist and designer showed at Fashion Week a very picturesque collection of flower-picture dresses by Crowe-Posen. On the things of Zac Posen, the slightly gloomy and grotesque drips of paint from Crowe's hand surprisingly acquired a lighter character, but did not lose the main thing - contrast and energy.

Popular by topic