Outfits For Modern Milady (and D'Artagnan!) In The New Chanel Métiers D'art Collection
Outfits For Modern Milady (and D'Artagnan!) In The New Chanel Métiers D'art Collection

Video: Outfits For Modern Milady (and D'Artagnan!) In The New Chanel Métiers D'art Collection

Video: What's worth it from the NEW Chanel Collection 2021? 21A / Metiers d'Art 2022, December
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Chanel show finale
Chanel show finale

Chanel Métiers d'art shows are always tied to a specific point on the map or historical era - therefore, their theme is easy to guess in advance, by the location of the upcoming show. That is why this time, when representatives of the House announced that the show would be held at the Chenonceau castle, it was approximately clear what it would be about. Of course, about the Renaissance - what else can be inspired by the collection shown in the 16th century Chateau on the banks of the Loire? And about feminism - after all, the Chenonceau castle is also often called "ladies'". It is not surprising: its history is connected with the names of two outstanding women at once - Queen of France Catherine de Medici and the favorite of her husband Henry II, Diane de Poitiers.

Chanel Métiers d'art 2020-21
Chanel Métiers d'art 2020-21
Chanel Métiers d'art 2020-21
Chanel Métiers d'art 2020-21

The location and theme of the show were not chosen by chance (and is there anything random in the Chanel universe?). The legendary Mademoiselle Chanel herself has never hidden her admiration for Renaissance women - and even wrote an inspirational essay on this topic. In addition, the Chenonceau castle is decorated with Catherine de 'Medici's monograms, suspiciously reminiscent of the crossed Cs on the Chanel logo. It is not known whether Chanel borrowed the idea of ​​the French queen, but it was impossible not to take advantage of such a moment. Yes, and the aesthetics of Renaissance clothing surprisingly harmoniously falls on the codes of the French House. Stand-up collars, as in the ceremonial portraits of French monarchs (and archival photos of Gabrielle Chanel herself), perfectly match classic pearl threads, and musketeer boots - under the legendary tweed.Ideas for prints and embroidery on maxi skirts and jacket lapels were discovered in the castle garden. And lush crinolines, flying raincoats and sharp caps with veils were at all quotes from the costumes of the era - literal, but no less beautiful from this.

As for feminism, it was also not at all on duty designated only by a location in the form of a "ladies'" castle. Many items in the collection have a very interesting androgynous overtones - after all, these are, in fact, originally items from the men's wardrobe. High boots, black raincoats, white leggings for short shorts and skirts, wide-brimmed hats - all this would obviously suit D'Artagnan more than Milady. But this is in the 16th century - and today such borrowing is very welcome. The heroine Chanel does not see herself in the role of a submissive wife and mistress of the house (even if we are talking about the whole castle). She, like the very founder of the fashion house, is on a par with men - and therefore is not afraid to wear their things. Just as Chanel herself once borrowed trousers from men, so Virginie Viard now dresses her models in the attire of modern musketeers.But she does not forget about Milady today either - for them there will always be feminine skirts and dresses in maxi length, miniature handbags and elegant jewelry. And this understanding of the needs of women - very different - is the quintessence of the spirit of Chanel. A house designed by a woman and for women.

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