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Proteins: Vegetable VS Animals
Proteins: Vegetable VS Animals

Video: Proteins: Vegetable VS Animals

Video: Plant Based Protein Vs. Animal Based Protein - Biochemical Differences in Absorption and Utilization 2022, December
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Experts around the world continue to actively debate whether it is possible to get everything the body needs from plant foods. In particular, we are talking about proteins. In our material, we have collected everything you need to know about plant and animal proteins: how they differ and why some cannot replace others by 100%.

Why is protein necessary?

Protein is a macronutrient that is an essential part of every cell in the human body. Along with fats and carbohydrates, protein is necessary for the normal functioning of all body systems from the musculoskeletal to the nervous and cardiovascular. Proteins, or rather the amino acids of which they are composed, form a kind of "building blocks" that make up the entire body. They are responsible for bone strength, tissue regeneration (both skin and internal organs) and many other processes.

Protein deficiency is fraught with various unpleasant consequences for the body. With a slight lack of protein, the water-salt balance is disturbed, which leads to fluid retention in the body and the formation of edema. With a more serious deficiency, the process of tissue regeneration is disrupted, the condition of the hair and nails is greatly deteriorated, and in addition, immunity is greatly weakened, since the body needs proteins, and not fats or carbohydrates, to produce immunoglobulins.

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What is the difference between plant and animal proteins?

Let's go back to the structure of proteins. They consist of special compounds - amino acids, which, in turn, are replaceable and irreplaceable. There are nine types of irreplaceable amino acids, and they cannot be produced by the body on its own, therefore, they must be supplied with food. When a protein contains all nine essential amino acids, it is considered complete; if it lacks at least one, it is considered inferior.

So, all proteins of animal origin are complete, which means that including them in your diet in the proper amount, you noticeably facilitate the work of all systems of your body and ensure the prevention of many chronic diseases. With vegetable proteins, the situation is a little more complicated: firstly, not a single vegetable product (except for soy) contains complete proteins, one or two essential amino acids are always lacking; secondly, the concentration of protein in animal and plant products is different. For example, 100 g of almonds and 100 g of chicken breast contain approximately the same amount of protein, but the foods have different nutritional values, and eating as many nuts as chicken is harmful to the body.

However, even following a plant-based diet, you can get all the essential amino acids, you just have to approach the issue more carefully. In most cases, plant proteins only lack one essential amino acid, and the different groups of plant proteins are compatible with each other, which means that their combinations form a complete amino acid profile. For example, rice or quinoa with beans is considered ideal. These foods will not only make a great dinner, but also provide the body with all the essential amino acids.

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