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Laboratory Earth: An Art Exhibition On The Verge Of Science Fiction
Laboratory Earth: An Art Exhibition On The Verge Of Science Fiction

Video: Laboratory Earth: An Art Exhibition On The Verge Of Science Fiction

Video: EPOS @ GeoUtrecht2020 virtual conference, 23-26 August 2020 2022, December
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Today, June 22, at the Krasny Oktyabr factory, the exhibition of the Polytechnic Museum and the Ars Electroniсa Electronics Center “Laboratory Earth” opens, which presents scientific, artistic and technological experiments that touch on key topics in the life of modern society: rethinking the Earth's resources, appear in humans in connection with scientific and technological progress and the phenomenon of digital culture. Here, viewers play the role of scientists, developers and travelers, whose research path runs through cascades of circuits and series of experiments, many of which are interactive.

“We are united by the ideas of enlightenment, popularization of science and technology, as well as the task of creating a space of free thought and experiment for all visitors,” explains Natalya Fuks, one of the project curators from the Polytechnic Museum. “The idea of ​​creative understanding of our planet as a laboratory is very close to me.”

You can look at the "laboratory" works of artists from Russia, Europe and Japan until September 25, and take a virtual tour with curator Natalia Fuks, who told Bazaar.ru about the most striking exhibits of the exhibition and their authors, right now.

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Natalia Fuks at the exhibition "Laboratory Earth"

1. Earth. Finnbogi Petursson, Iceland

In his work, which echoes the title of the exhibition, Finnbogi Petursson generates vibrations with a frequency of 7.8 Hz in a pool of water. Sound can be heard and felt, and can even be seen in ripples on the surface of the water. This frequency is associated with a physical phenomenon known as "Schumann resonance", which describes the vibrations of the Earth's electromagnetic field. Petursson views this frequency as the pulse of the Earth. In this work, the artist acts in a style familiar to him: he is known for his works in which sound, sculpture, architecture, painting and movement are synthesized together, where the boundaries of artistic expression are blurred to create installations with the effect of deep sensory immersion. Petursson does not reduce noise to its acoustic characteristics. By raising sound to the category of physical substances,he transforms sound waves into graphics and sculpture. Acoustic elements are used in his installations along with material material, they are complemented by images of water and light, and all together help to create a visual illustration of the effect of a sound wave on environments. The discreet acoustic background supports the meditative atmosphere of the installation evoking associations with Icelandic landscapes.

2. Air travel. Ursula Neugebauer, Germany

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At the heart of this impressive installation at the intersection of fashion, art and architecture is a very simple concept about the relationship of beauty and simplicity. A simple mechanical process - movement - creates a colorful effect. Several mannequins are dressed in long dresses of scarlet taffeta and are powered by an electric motor controlled by a computer. Uncomplicated mechanisms and fabric cuts are connected in an incomprehensible way into a composition - a poetic image of dance that says so much about human nature.

I can note a similar laconic approach in the work of the Russian artist Yulia Glukhova, who made for the exhibition the work "Plasticity of the Flame", in which the flame is simply visualized and the sound of fire is imitated. A separate room is allocated for this installation so that the viewer can communicate with this meditative work.

Julia Glukhova. Flame ductility

3. Measuring device. Leo Pest, Austria

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Austrian artist and researcher specializing in digital media art presents his Zermeisser robot at the exhibition. This is a physical art object, whose task is to pave the way through a given space, transforming in accordance with the parameters of the environment. By changing the length of its sides, the robot breaks its own ideal symmetry, and sensors installed on its tops help to sense the boundaries of the room through which the path of the mechanism passes. Information about the position and length of individual modules and their relative position allows the object to move freely in space, moving the center of gravity.

4. Mine detector. Massoud Hassani, Afghanistan - Holland

Massoud Hassani designed and built a wind-powered device heavy enough to defuse mines as they pass through minefields. The idea of ​​the project is rooted in Hassani's childhood. He grew up on the outskirts of Kabul and often played with his younger brother, making wind toys. Sometimes these toys were lost in the sand, carried away by the wind into minefields, where it was too dangerous to look for them. Mines have been the cause of many accidents, often involving children playing in the neighborhood. Hassani's mine detector is a human-sized construction. In its center there is a metal case weighing 17 kg, surrounded by dozens of bamboo “legs” sticking out in all directions, at the ends of which are fixed round plastic “soles”. A GPS device is placed inside the ball,which allows you to track the distance traveled and make a map of theoretically cleared areas. This information will be available online in real time. The soles provide cushioning, allowing the structure to roll over bumps, ditches and other obstacles. The weight of the entire structure is just over 80 kg. This mass is enough to activate the explosive mechanism - the structure is a mechanical model of a person and reproduces the gait and weight of the human body. With each mine, the structure loses only a couple of "legs", and is capable of neutralizing three or four charges in one expedition. One such mechanism costs about $ 60. It is faster, safer and 120 times cheaper than traditional mine clearance methods.The soles provide cushioning, allowing the structure to roll over bumps, ditches and other obstacles. The weight of the entire structure is just over 80 kg. This mass is enough to activate the explosive mechanism - the structure is a mechanical model of a person and reproduces the gait and weight of the human body. With each mine, the structure loses only a couple of "legs", and is capable of neutralizing three or four charges in one expedition. One such mechanism costs about $ 60. It is faster, safer and 120 times cheaper than traditional mine clearance methods.The soles provide cushioning, allowing the structure to roll over bumps, ditches and other obstacles. The weight of the entire structure is just over 80 kg. This mass is enough to activate the explosive mechanism - the structure is a mechanical model of a person and reproduces the gait and weight of the human body. With each mine, the structure loses only a couple of "legs", and is capable of neutralizing three or four charges in one expedition. One such mechanism costs about $ 60. It is faster, safer and 120 times cheaper than traditional mine clearance methods.to activate the explosive mechanism - the structure is a mechanical model of a person and reproduces the gait and weight of the human body. With each mine, the structure loses only a couple of "legs", and is capable of neutralizing three or four charges in one expedition. One such mechanism costs about $ 60. It is faster, safer and 120 times cheaper than traditional mine clearance methods.to activate the explosive mechanism - the structure is a mechanical model of a person and reproduces the gait and weight of the human body. With each mine, the structure loses only a couple of "legs", and is capable of neutralizing three or four charges in one expedition. One such mechanism costs about $ 60. It is faster, safer and 120 times cheaper than traditional mine clearance methods.

5. Divider. Dima Morozov, Russia

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The main idea of ​​the project of the Russian media artist, working under the pseudonym: vtol, is an abstract artistic interpretation of quantum-wave dualism - the principle according to which any physical object can be described both using a mathematical apparatus based on wave equations, and using formalism based on the idea of ​​an object as a particle or as a system of particles. As a classic example of such dualism, light can be interpreted as a stream of corpuscles (photons), which in many physical effects exhibit the properties of electromagnetic waves. The uncertainty principle, which follows from the principle of wave-particle duality and was discovered by Werner Heisenberg in 1927, is one of the cornerstones of physical quantum mechanics. The work is a complex light and musical object,in which directional lines of light are repeatedly and sequentially interrupted by mechanical rotating fans, creating a multiphase source of undefined events. The uncertainty relation sets the lower limit for the product of the standard deviations of a pair of quantum observables. Ultimately, a divided and unstable system transforms into a set of binary states that transform light into a discrete matrix of messages, ultimately generating sound waves (composition). Thus, the work tries to touch upon and describe global issues of being in the experimental language of art. Is the Universe Discrete? Is it possible, according to the precepts of Nikola Tesla, to describe the entire universe in terms of energy, frequency and vibration?but not synchronously interrupted by mechanical rotating fans, creating a multi-phase source of undefined events. The uncertainty relation sets the lower limit for the product of the standard deviations of a pair of quantum observables. Ultimately, a divided and unstable system transforms into a set of binary states that transform light into a discrete matrix of messages, ultimately generating sound waves (composition). Thus, the work tries to touch and describe global issues of being in the experimental language of art. Is the Universe Discrete? Is it possible, according to the precepts of Nikola Tesla, to describe the entire universe in terms of energy, frequency and vibration?but not synchronously interrupted by mechanical rotating fans, creating a multi-phase source of undefined events. The uncertainty relation sets the lower limit for the product of the standard deviations of a pair of quantum observables. Ultimately, a divided and unstable system transforms into a set of binary states that transform light into a discrete matrix of messages, ultimately generating sound waves (composition). Thus, the work tries to touch upon and describe global issues of being in the experimental language of art. Is the Universe Discrete? Is it possible, according to the precepts of Nikola Tesla, to describe the entire universe in terms of energy, frequency and vibration?The uncertainty relation sets the lower limit for the product of the standard deviations of a pair of quantum observables. Ultimately, a divided and unstable system transforms into a set of binary states that transform light into a discrete matrix of messages, ultimately generating sound waves (composition). Thus, the work tries to touch upon and describe global issues of being in the experimental language of art. Is the Universe Discrete? Is it possible, according to the precepts of Nikola Tesla, to describe the entire universe in terms of energy, frequency and vibration?The uncertainty relation sets the lower limit for the product of the standard deviations of a pair of quantum observables. Ultimately, a divided and unstable system transforms into a set of binary states that transform light into a discrete matrix of messages, ultimately generating sound waves (composition). Thus, the work tries to touch upon and describe global issues of being in the experimental language of art. Is the Universe Discrete? Is it possible, according to the precepts of Nikola Tesla, to describe the entire universe in terms of energy, frequency and vibration?the work tries to touch and describe global issues of being in the experimental language of art. Is the Universe Discrete? Is it possible, according to the precepts of Nikola Tesla, to describe the entire universe in terms of energy, frequency and vibration?the work tries to touch and describe global issues of being in the experimental language of art. Is the Universe Discrete? Is it possible, according to the precepts of Nikola Tesla, to describe the entire universe in terms of energy, frequency and vibration?

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